There is something extremely emotional about hearing "Taps" played on a horn. Just the first few notes can send goosebumps up your arms and leave a heaviness in your heart.

Remember this emotional moment atop Mount Washington last Memorial Day?

According to an article on History.com, the origin of Taps is an interesting one that dates back to the Civil War. in 1862, a dude named General Daniel Butterfield wasn't a huge fan of the bugle call they had been using to let the soldiers know is was time for lights out. He thought it should sound a little more peaceful and melodious!

The article goes on to explain that he came up with the 24 note tune we now know as Taps and had his bugler at the time play it for the men. The song caught on like wildfire  (social media was 140 years away from being invented so it spread the old fashioned way) Before they knew it buglers from other units of the Army started playing it. Not long after that it was played at a military funeral. It became clear that playing this song was safer than firing  three rifle volleys over the soldier’s grave. No one could confuse the song as an attack.

Yesterday Elena Duguay Morton had a pretty heartwarming experience involving this song and she shared it with her Facebook friends. Elena was taking her kids Trick-or-Treating in Dover, New Hampshire.

"Three amigos" and a clown approached a house and were ready to redeem their sweet loot.

A woman answered the door and told the kids that sadly she ran out of candy!

She went on to say that her 94-year-old husband who fought in World War 2 can play Taps on the Bugle and he's REALLY good.

She went to go get him and the kids stood and waited patiently. Then this happened:

This moment was more profound and far sweeter than any amount of candy. These children walked away with a memory that will last a lifetime.

And to that hero, thank you for you service. 🙏

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