Paint Rochester Blue for Thank a Police Officer Day

The first September 18 that I lived in Rochester I thought ‘wow, they really support the police here!’ having no idea that September 18 was National Thank a Police Officer Day.  Since Rochester, New Hampshire is such an artistically talented town it's very fun when National Thank a Police Officer Day comes around.  Number one, the town really does love and support its police force and number two, they are very creative.

 

Paint the town blue

 

According to city Laura Ring of the Greater Rochester Chamber of Commerce “Paint the City Blue was formed in order to give residents and business owners the opportunity to thank the Police Department for their work.  It’s a great way for the community to come together for something positive.”  I am thinking of putting a blue ribbon in my apartment window.  People and business all over town use their creative skills to show support.  Everything from blue lightbulbs, blue string lights on trees, and even yard signs.

 

Spaulding High School and Rochester Middle School Participate

 

Even the local schools get filled with the spirit.  The students will be painting local shop windows.  According to Spaulding High Art Teacher Jennifer Daly, the project is a bonding experience between the police and the students.  The event is put together with the help of the Greater Rochester Chamber of Commerce, Rochester Rotary Club, Holy Rosary Credit Union, Rochester Elks Lodge #1393, Rochester Main Street, Groen Construction, The Ridge, and many others according to city officials.  If you see a police officer any day of the year, thank them for their service.

GO BLUE!

 

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