After a break, the time-worn method has returned for catching drivers operating under the influence.

For the summer of 2019, New Hampshire State Police changed up their traditional method of nabbing drunk and impaired drivers. The popularity of social media has lessened the impact of 'sobriety checkpoints.' Instead, law enforcement opted for 'DWI saturation patrols.' In these, a large group of officers patrol an entire area, instead of setting up shop on one road and stopping drivers.

Starting this weekend, checkpoints are back in force. According to the Portsmouth Patch, New Hampshire State Police announced that it will be working with local law enforcement on a sobriety checkpoint in the "Seabrook area." Troop A troopers applied for and received a superior court petition to host the checkpoint.

New Hampshire State police Lt. John Hennessy of Troop A. told the Portsmouth Patch  "The 'Sobriety Checkpoint' is one of the most effective methods of detecting and apprehending the impaired driver." "The program, approved by the NH Highway Safety Agency and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, provides federal highway safety funds to support this checkpoint, which will be conducted in Seabrook."