This is one of the most disturbing stories I've heard in a while.

According to CBS Boston, a 54-year-old woman from Bedford, New Hampshire, has been accused of keeping her mother's corpse in her house for five months while she collected her Social Security payments.

 

The news station reported that family members hadn't seen Kimberly Heller's mom in a while and expressed concern, which led to the police wellness check.

If these accusations are true, there is a lot to unpack here.

Just one of many questions: How hard up financially must one be to go to such great lengths to collect a monthly check?

Police went to Heller's house on October 24 and no one was home, according to CBS Boston. They returned a day later, but Kimberly refused to let police inside. Once they gained a searched warrant, they returned that day and discovered the body, the news station noted.

The State Medical Examiner conducted an autopsy and determined the mother passed away in May of natural causes, according to CBS Boston.,

Heller is being charged with "abuse of a corpse," which is defined as "a person intentionally and unlawfully disinters, digs up, removes, conceals, mutilates or destroys a human corpse, or any part or the ashes thereof."

Heller is due in court in early January of 2022.

 

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